Terroir Budapest 

Budapest is as beautiful and as dynamic as any other major European centre but its gastronomic identity has remained largely uncelebrated  - a pity given the shear scale, diversity and breadth of natural produce on offer. At the Terroir Budapest Wine & Food Symposium international & local chefs, Hungarian producers & restaurateurs, innovators, culinary tourism experts, journalists, media, and wine experts came together through interactive workshops, masterclasses and learning salons to foster Hungary's new-food future.

 
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200+

#terroirbudapest uses

 

10+

native ingredients and producers spotlighted

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100+

forum visitors

 

20

wineries showcased from all over Hungary

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40+ 

companies

 

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partners


Participants

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András Jokuti

Food Journalist, Budapest

 

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Zsófia Mautner

Food Writer and Author, Budapest

Amanda Cohen

Chef, Owner, Dirt Candy, NYC

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 Miguel rocha vieira

Executive Chef, Costes Restaurant

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Mercedes Bachelet

Group General Manager, Adam/Albin
 

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Miguel Andrade

Food writer, Researcher

 

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Mátyás Szik

Head Sommelier, Four Seasons Budapest

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Rebecca Mackenzie

President, Canada Culinary Tourism

Istvan Veres

Head Chef, Babel Restaurant

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Albert Ponzo

Executive Chef, The Royal Hotel

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Fiona Beckett

Food and Drink Journalist

 

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Eniko Kiraly

Rex Vinorum & Rex Ciborum Brand Ambassador

 

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Magdalena Kaiser

Wine Marketer and MW Student

 

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Robert Gilvesy

Organic Wine Producer, Hungary
 

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Mara Jernigan

Chef, Farmer, Environmentalist

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Péter Baracskay

Farmer, Biologist
 

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Panna Balazsy

Journalist, Budapest

 

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Olga Badowska

Food journalist, editor and researcher

 

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Sebastian Frank

Chef/Owner, HORVÁTH, Berlin

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ZSOKA FEKETE

Mangalitsa Farmer, Hungary

 

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Jeremy Bonia

Sommelier, Raymonds
 

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Per Meurling

Food Writer and Photographer

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Tálos Attila

Wine Merchant and Winemaker
 

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Aron Kelemen

Creative Head Chef, Mazel Tov Restaurant

 

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Dez o'connell

Bartender and Bar Manager, Brody House Group


What people said

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Presenter

“Terroir Budapest was a great event for showcasing some of the most interesting developments and fascinating products of the Hungarian terroir, all while having the opportunity to meet key players in the industry.”

Andras Jokuti
Leading Hungarian food blogger

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guest Delegate

"As a wine professional, it’s always exciting to visit and learn about an undiscovered wine region, especially to meet the producers, merchants and sommeliers who share their knowledge with you. That is exactly what Terroir Budapest and our trip to the Balaton provided. I managed to meet some outstanding winemakers in the Balaton region and have already arranged for my first shipment of Hungarian wines."

Jeremy Bonia
Sommelier, Raymonds Restaurant

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Forum attendee

“Terroir offers a massively high level of expertise and know-how in the field of sustainable gastronomy, culinary & wine tourism which supports local businesses. In the development of business relations and exchange of information it’s more effective since buyers, influencers and experts come away with a real experience and become a trusted ambassador of the region. This depth is impossible to reach through expositions or tradeshows - Terroir creates community.”

Janka Jakobos
CEO, Chefworks Romania/Hungary


Building Hungarian pride in volcanic wine

“Hungary has a glorious wine history. During the Renaissance, Hungary produced some of the world’s most sought-after elixirs. The future is even more exciting as Hungarians rediscover their superb collection of volcanic terroirs.” John Szabo | Volcanic Wine, Salt, Grit and Power
 


One of the highlights of Terroir Budapest’s International Wine & Hospitality Forum was an interactive volcanic wine masterclass hosted by Hungarian winemaker, Robert Gilvesy, and MW student, Magda Kaiser. The masterclass encompassed tastings of five indigenous varieties of the Furmint, Jufark, Kéknyelű, Hárslevelő and Olaszriesling grapes grown in the volcanic regions of Badacsony, Balaton Highlands, Muzla, Mátra, Somló, and Tokaji Hegyálj, as well the Rhine Riesling international varietal grown in Hungary since the beginning of the 18th century.

Panellists including international experts and buyers Jeremy Bonia, Mercedes Bachelet, Attila Tálos and Mátáyas Szik who discussed how Hungarian wines could strengthen and shape their image on the world stage with local participating wineries including Bott FrigyesLosonci BálintPálffy GyulaSzabó GyulaVáli PéterGilvesy Robert and Tamás Kis.


Native Hungarian ingredients

 Grey Cattle  The Hungarian Grey Cow is protected by law and an iconic national symbol. Its vehemence, beauty and delicious meat have made it known all over the world and Hungary’s most iconic dish, Goulash, was named after a staple Hungarian herdsman meal originating from the meat of grey cattle and made when cowboys would ride the animals during cattle drives and butcher the weaker ones to make soups and stews

Grey Cattle

The Hungarian Grey Cow is protected by law and an iconic national symbol. Its vehemence, beauty and delicious meat have made it known all over the world and Hungary’s most iconic dish, Goulash, was named after a staple Hungarian herdsman meal originating from the meat of grey cattle and made when cowboys would ride the animals during cattle drives and butcher the weaker ones to make soups and stews

 Paprika  The Hungarian scientist, Albert Szent-Györgyi, won the Nobel Prize in 1937 in part for the discovery of, and extraction of, vitamin C in paprika peppers. You’ll find this staple ingredient in pretty much every Hungarian kitchen. Because of the comparatively cooler climate, Hungarian paprika is much sweeter than its South American counterparts, so sweet in fact, you’ll even find it inside Hungarian cakes!

Paprika

The Hungarian scientist, Albert Szent-Györgyi, won the Nobel Prize in 1937 in part for the discovery of, and extraction of, vitamin C in paprika peppers. You’ll find this staple ingredient in pretty much every Hungarian kitchen. Because of the comparatively cooler climate, Hungarian paprika is much sweeter than its South American counterparts, so sweet in fact, you’ll even find it inside Hungarian cakes!

 Mangalitsa Pig  The Mangalitsa is a rare, Old World, heritage pig breed with a 200-year-old Hungarian lineage. A descendent of the European wild boar, the Mangalitsa has garnered international support from both farmers and chefs in recent year as a result of its high fat content, surprisingly concentrated flavour, and beautifully marbled meat which is considered some of the tastiest pork in the world.

Mangalitsa Pig

The Mangalitsa is a rare, Old World, heritage pig breed with a 200-year-old Hungarian lineage. A descendent of the European wild boar, the Mangalitsa has garnered international support from both farmers and chefs in recent year as a result of its high fat content, surprisingly concentrated flavour, and beautifully marbled meat which is considered some of the tastiest pork in the world.

 Wine  Located in the middle of the Carpathian Basin, surrounded by high mountains and blessed with a notably long growing season, it’s no surprise that Hungary boasts 22 different wine regions alongside a rich and varied terroir which gives way to a whole host of indigenous grape varieties. There's Furmint, Olaszrizling, Hárslevelü and Sárgamuskotály for the whites; Kékfrankos, and Kadarka to name a few reds. Impressive volcanic soils in the north of the country also mean Hungary’s wines are as diverse as they come.

Wine

Located in the middle of the Carpathian Basin, surrounded by high mountains and blessed with a notably long growing season, it’s no surprise that Hungary boasts 22 different wine regions alongside a rich and varied terroir which gives way to a whole host of indigenous grape varieties. There's Furmint, Olaszrizling, Hárslevelü and Sárgamuskotály for the whites; Kékfrankos, and Kadarka to name a few reds. Impressive volcanic soils in the north of the country also mean Hungary’s wines are as diverse as they come.

 Goose Liver   Hungary is actually the world’s biggest exporter of foie gras made from goose liver (a title often mistakenly given to the French), shipping a whopping 1,800 tonnes of it per year to countries including France, Belgium and Japan. In Hungary, the delicacy is made according to traditions dating back to the 15th century. And  Libamaj , as it’s called, is so revered that the country even hosts an annual foie gras festival in Budapest.

Goose Liver


Hungary is actually the world’s biggest exporter of foie gras made from goose liver (a title often mistakenly given to the French), shipping a whopping 1,800 tonnes of it per year to countries including France, Belgium and Japan. In Hungary, the delicacy is made according to traditions dating back to the 15th century. And Libamaj, as it’s called, is so revered that the country even hosts an annual foie gras festival in Budapest.

 Cheese  The words fejni (milked) and vaj (butter) already existed in 11th century Hungary. And the production of sheep-milk cheese (and later cow-milk cheese) was so integral to Hungary’s pastoral life and trade, that during the Turkish occupation a part of the tax had to be paid by cheese. Look out for delicious varieties including Trappista, Liptauer, Orda, Oázis and Pálpusztai.

Cheese

The words fejni (milked) and vaj (butter) already existed in 11th century Hungary. And the production of sheep-milk cheese (and later cow-milk cheese) was so integral to Hungary’s pastoral life and trade, that during the Turkish occupation a part of the tax had to be paid by cheese. Look out for delicious varieties including Trappista, Liptauer, Orda, Oázis and Pálpusztai.


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